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Where to post online psychology studies for participant recruitment?

Where to post online psychology studies for participant recruitment?

A common challenge when running psychological studies is getting enough participants. Of course, there are many general strategies for recruiting participants, but I was specifically interested in forums and web pages that are specifically designed for posting links about online psychological studies.

For a given forum, are there any rules about what can be posted? is there any indication of the likely response rate?


Sites:

  • The social psychology network has a page for posting online social psychology studies. There are a range of requirements. In particular, it needs to be closely related to social or personality psychology.

  • SampleSize Subreddit is a community dedicated to completing surveys. They like it when results will be provided at study completion. It has close to 10,000 subscribers at time of posting. I have also seen posts to other subreddits such as the psych subreddit. However, such forums do not always react positively to such postings. If there is particular alignment between the topic and the reddit forum, then there is more likely to be a positive response.

  • Psychology Research on the Net is a site maintained by Dr John H. Krantz at Hanover College. It lists a lot of different studies.

  • Online Psychology Research UK contains several hundred studies and is maintained by Dr Kathryn Gardner from University of Central Lancashire.

  • PsychStudies is maintained by Andrew Thomas from Swansea University.

  • Psych Forums has a section for posting studies to a section of their forum. However, they do require some form of payment for posting.

General observations

  • Most of these forums require that you have ethics clearance.

Other strategies

  • As @lmjohns3 mentions Mechanical Turk is a more general strategy
  • http://beta.cognilab.com/ looks like it might try to make the process of using Mechanical Turk simpler
  • Many general purpose forums on the internet have an "off-topic" section, which can be effective if the topic of the study is aligned with the topic of the forum. In particular, I have heard about people getting very large samples when posting research surveys to appropriately themed SubReddits.

In Germany, most students and many researchers conduct their online surveys using the portals soscisurvey.de and unipark.info. Soscisurvey.de includes a so-called "panel", a pool of currently more than 100.000 persons interested in partaking in surveys. To use the panel, you do not have to host your survey on soscisurvey.de, but you must apply a month in advance and comply with the conditions for use (the panel and its members are German). There is an English language conference poster describing the panel.

I know that this answer is restricted to Germany, but maybe something similar exists for other countries and it will give you an idea for your search.


After I had finished writing my master's thesis in 2015, I decided to (try to) tackle the problem of small sample sizes with a new approach. The goal was to develop a website that allows everyone to post their empirical study (online survey or experiment) and to find additional participants based on the principle of voluntary and fair mutual support.

The project has turned into a small start-up called SurveyCircle and the website www.surveycircle.com. The platform was recently launched in 9 English speaking countries. The usage is free and you can see all current studies without even signing up.


This depends heavily on what sort of study you are trying to do, but I know of a number of cognitive science and computational linguistics studies in the past several years that have used Amazon's Mechanical Turk to run subjects online.

As an example from behavioral economics, see Paolacci, Chandler, and Ipeirotis, "Running experiments on Mechanical Turk", Judgment and Decision Making, vol 5, no 5, 2010: http://repub.eur.nl/res/pub/31983/jdm10630a%255B1%255D.pdf


Psych Forums has a section for posting studies to a section of their forum. However, they do require some form of payment for posting.

In fact it's not exact. As explained here : http://www.psychforums.com/surveys-studies/topic44450.html if you are a "professor/researcher/student in a university/college/institute/faculty of psychology" it's entirely free and you get your links somehow included in specific forums so you have exact targeted audience for your studies.

Note that psych forums has more than 125'000 members, hundreds of forums and gets about 40'000 visitors a day so it's kind of ideal if you have any research to achieve.


In my opinion, Psychforums.com is by far the best place to post online studies, but your school/university needs to establish a partnership with them first. Best is to speak with your professor or someone responsible for your Psychology department in order to have that partnership in place, which is in fact really easy (see the post before). Once done, all the students/researchers/professors of your school will be able to post there, so it's not on a per-study basis. Also, your study can be exposed in 3 specific forums.

The problem with the other places is that it's focusing on online studies, so only people searching specifically for online studies will found them, and you also only get participants interested in cash reward, which I suspect change results, as it drags in people that might not be interested in your online study at all. On Psychforums you can have very specific targeted audience as well as a very general audience depending on which forum you ask to be exposed to, and those participants are not coming to Psychforums initially to participate in a study. Of course it depends on your study, but in my personal experience, I got more than 50 participants in a week, while all the other places I've posted brought me less than 5 participants.


A relatively new site for subject recruitment online is Prolific Academic. It is a Mechanical Turk competitor targeted at the academic market. It offers some features that mturk doesn't that may be useful for researchers, such as more in depth pre-screening and demographics information. A potential negative of the site is that they currently require a minimum payment rate of $7.50/hour, which is more expensive than the typical Turk rate.


Best practices checklist

Stand out with an effective headline

User testing has shown that this is the most important part of the flyer. Headlines should:

  • Catch the attention of your target audience. If your flyer is hanging on a wall among dozens of others, what would make it stand out?
  • Avoid generic language such as, “Research study seeking participants”
  • Clearly state the purpose of the research study. For example: “Is your current antidepressant not helping your mood?” “Do you have asthma?” “Have you given birth in the past 6 months?”

Include mandatory IRB details

The templates include room for the mandatory details as designated by the IRB:

  • Condensed study title
  • Purpose of the study
  • Protocol summary
  • Basic eligibility criteria
  • Study site location(s)
  • How to contact the study site for more information

Include these mandatory details in as succinct a fashion as possible (see example templates). By including these details, you ensure individuals are contacting you because (1) they qualify for the study and (2) they have enough information to make an informed decision about deciding to participate. This saves time for both the researcher and the potential participant.

Tailor your message to your audience

Keep it simple and concise. Many people find it difficult to retain a lot of written information.

  • Did you know that participants are interested in research studies that are beneficial to their communities? Think about how your study will benefit the people you are trying to recruit and include that information on your recruitment materials. Unsure of the benefits? Consider including members of the community or your target population in study planning and development of recruitment materials.
  • Did you know that the average reading level in Alachua County is middle school, and that people who cannot comprehend the information presented in recruitment are less likely to participate in clinical studies? Consider how you would explain your study to a neighbor, and make sure the information on the flyer passes the “small-talk test.”

You can use these tools to help write participant-friendly recruitment messages:

    offers guidelines and resources to help you create easy-to-read health materials. : Enter medical terms and view alternative phrasing to simplify the description.

Select an engaging image

Photos and images can draw more interest from potential participants. Make sure images are:

  • Relevant to your study and represent your target audience (e.g., includes older adults if recruiting for an aging study)
  • High-quality (i.e., large file size that will display well, not pixelated, in print). Image should be at least 600 x 600 pixels.
  • Yours to use on the flyer (i.e. you created the image and have permission from photo subjects, or you have rights to use a photo that you did not take, and you properly credit the image according to terms of use)

You can find FREE stock photos on these websites:

Format your content

Format matters, especially to readability: The text boxes within the templates are sized for maximum effectiveness. Keep it simple and concise!

  • Having trouble fitting all of your information on the flyer? Try condensing the content.
  • Use bulleted lists to break up content and optimize readability
  • Do not adjust the margins to fit more content
  • Do not decrease the font below 10 points

Use the correct branding and logo

When do you use the UF brand vs. the UF Health brand? That depends. UF Health brand and logo


Research

We currently have a series of research projects available for ambitious undergraduate students that involve qualitative analysis, data entry, grant writing, participant recruitment, and physical and mental health in underserved female populations. Subsequently, there will be some quantitative data analysis and intervention fidelity assessment as well. Most of our research relates to domestic violence, motivation, and addiction in the court and clinical settings among justice-involved women.

Interns will engage with research staff, healthcare providers, community health workers, and research subjects to assist the efforts of the Women’s Initiative Supporting Health (W.I.S.H.) program, which is directed by Diane S. Morse, MD and housed within the Department of Psychiatry. Ideally, the internship would be 10-15 hours weekly, which could be flexible during exam or school break times. There is also the option of working with us for 4-hour course credit or during the summer. Opportunities for authorship on presentations and clinical experience are available to highly motivated individuals.

Educational benefits include: relevant training, weekly literature reviews, and mentorship for graduate school/medical school applications. Students able to make a two-semester commitment will be given preference. Apply 3 months in advance minimum.

Contact: Dr. Diane Morse, [email protected], (585) 275-6484

Internalizing Disorder and Emotional Adjustment Lab

Supervisor: Lisa R. Starr, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing for this project

Come join a fun, friendly, collaborative research lab!

Research assistants are wanted for research examining the etiology and consequences of depression and anxiety disorders in adolescence and adulthood in the Starr Lab. RAs will gain valuable research and clinical experience and will have the opportunity to be involved in the lab in a variety of ways: we ask our RAs to do everything from administrative tasks to performing literature reviews to conducting participant visits. Some RAs may have the opportunity to be trained on and conduct semi-structured interviews with adolescent participants, an experience that fosters both research and clinical skills.

We are looking for highly motivated, conscientious students with strong interpersonal skills and plenty of excitement about research on depression and related topics. This experience is particularly well-suited for students interested in eventually pursuing graduate studies in clinical psychology or a related field.

You can learn more about our labs interests and projects at our website psych.rochester.edu/research/starrlab. To apply, click on the "Join Us!" tab on our website and fill out an online application. Questions can be directed to [email protected]

Mt. Hope Family Center

Supervisors: Liz Handley, PhD Sheree Toth, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

The Mt. Hope Family Center is an internationally recognized Center for leading edge research on child maltreatment. Our team of psychologists, researchers, and clinicians work together to help improve the lives of children and families who have experienced violence, abuse, neglect, or trauma. Our work includes a number of large-scale federally funded research projects, as well as federally and locally funded clinical service. As such we are seeking hard-working and conscientious undergraduate students to join our team.

Research Assistant (RA) responsibilities may include participating in research meetings, and assisting with data collection, entry, and organization. We are looking for undergraduate RAs who can commit approximately 10-15 hours per week and can make a 2 semester commitment either for course credit or as a volunteer. Interested students should contact Stephanie Capobianco.

Contact: Stephanie Capobianco, [email protected]

Project BRIDGE: Parents & Teens

Supervisors: Melissa Sturge-Apple, PhD Patrick Davies, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing for this project

Project BRIDGE is a multidisciplinary study that examines parent-child relationships in early adolescence. Data collection has ended, but we are currently seeking research assistants to conduct coding in either observational or narrative systems. Students can receive up to four credits during academic semesters and an optional seminar component is available for students who wish to learn more about the implications and general theories of the project.

For more information, or to receive an application, please visit our web site at www.RochesterFamilyResearch.org.

Contact: Melissa Sturge-Apple, PhD, [email protected]

Project FLIGHT

Supervisor: Melissa Sturge-Apple, Ph.D.
Recruitment is ongoing

Project FLIGHT is a multidisciplinary study that examines how interparental conflict influences interactions within the parent-child relationship. We are currently seeking research assistants to conduct observational coding of child assessments. Students can earn up to four credits by enrolling in PSY 391 during academic semesters. In addition, an optional seminar component is available for students who wish to learn more about the implications and general theories of the project.

Contact: Zhi Li, Ph.D., [email protected]

Project PROMISE

Supervisors: Sheree Toth, PhD Jody Todd Manly, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Project PROMISE is a study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development led by Dr. Sheree Toth and Dr. Jody Todd Manly. PROMISE is a Community Partnered Participatory Research project with a clinical intervention that will follow pregnant moms and their infants until their child is 15 months old. PROMISE partners with community health programs that work with pregnant women and their babies in under-served populations to address barriers to care and social determinates of health. Some PROMISE families receive Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) through PROMISE. CPP is an evidence-based preventative therapy that is shown to improve parent-child relationships, prevent child maltreatment, and result in more sensitive parenting and healthier child development. Project PROMISE uses self-report measures, research interviews, observational paradigms, biological measures of stress, and birth outcomes to better understand who can benefit from CPP, when CPP is most effective, and, if under resource constraints, if a shorter therapeutic window can be helpful.

Interested undergraduate research assistants will be responsible for assisting with visits, entering and checking data, childcare, and transcription, with opportunities for remote work. Interns will commit to at least 8 hours per week, and at least 2 semesters, with the possibility to continue in subsequent semesters.

Internship opportunities with Project PROMISE focus on interns gaining applicable skills to their future interests and professional development. This internship is fit for students interested in child development, infancy and pregnancy, maternal and infant health, clinical psychology, and/or developmental psychology, who wish to gain research experience, and hope to grow under a Research Assistant mentor system.

Students can earn up to 4 credit hours per semester for their work on this project by enrolling in PSYC 391.

Contact: Project PROMISE, [email protected], (585) 275-2991 x233

Project STEP

Supervisor: Patrick Davies, PhD, & Melissa Sturge-Apple, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Project STEP is a study that examines the coping and adjustment of preschoolers who have experienced different levels of interparental discord.

Undergraduate research assistants who join our lab will have the opportunity to evaluate interviews or observations and learn to implement systems for evaluating family adversity, family support, and children's coping with family stress. An optional seminar component is available for students who wish to learn more about the implications and general theories of the project.

Students can earn up to 4 credit hours per semester for their work on this project by enrolling in either PSY377 or PSY391.

Contact: Morgan Thompson, [email protected]

Project THRIVE

Supervisor: Patrick Davies, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Project THRIVE is a study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development led by Dr. Patrick Davies. We are interested in understanding how and why constructive family relationships and forms of conflict increase children's mental health and well-being during the preschool and early elementary school years. Through questionnaires, interaction tasks with family members, interviews, games with children, and physiological measures (eyetracking, EKG, and cortisol analysis), we hope to better understand the mechanisms and pathways linking interparental and parent-child relationships with children's psychological adjustment.

Interested undergraduate research assistants will be responsible for assisting with visits recording tasks, data uploading, coding, childcare, and recruitment. There will also be opportunities for professional development and research presentations. Interns will be required to dedicate up to 10 hours a week to their internship, which includes time at Mount Hope as well as related outside work, such as assigned readings.

The commitment to our project has a two semester minimum, with a possibility to continue in subsequent semesters. The internship opportunity with Project THRIVE focuses on the intern gaining applicable skills to their future interests and developing as a professional. This internship is fit for students who have interests in child development, family interactions, and/or developmental psychopathology, wish to gain research experience, and hope to grow as a professional under a Research Assistant mentor system.

Students can earn up to 4 credit hours per semester for their work on this project by enrolling in either PSY377 or PSY391.

Contact: Meera Patel, [email protected], (585) 275-2991 x 195

Research in Multiple Areas of Social Psychology

Supervisor: Miron Zuckerman, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Research assistants are needed for research on religiosity, self-esteem, self-enhancement, health, and other topics within and related to the field of social psychology. Assistants help with a wide variety of tasks, and are encouraged to get involved at every level of the research process.

Contact: Miron Zuckerman, PhD, [email protected]

Research on Achievement and Social Motivation

Supervisor: Andrew J. Elliot, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

We conduct research on why people behave the way they do in achievement situations (e.g., school, sports, work) and social situations. Our lab is quite diverse, usually comprising visiting professors and post-doctoral students from around the globe, as well as graduate students and undergraduate research assistants from the UR. 

We are always looking for interested, hard-working undergraduates to participate in all phases of the research process, beginning with data collection (subject running) and moving toward more full collaboration (including honor's theses and other writing projects).

Contact: Aleza Wallace, [email protected]

Research on Social Interaction and Close Relationships

Supervisor: Harry Reis, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

We conduct research on social interaction and close relationships. We welcome participation by students as research assistants.

Typically, students may expect to conduct any or all of several activities, including running experimental sessions, supervising Internet-based protocols, interviewing participants, coding open-ended responses, and data entry.

Contact: Harry Reis, [email protected]

School and Community Based Prevention Program

Supervisor: Peter A. Wyman, PhD
Recruiting is ongoing for this project.

Our research group focuses on developing and testing preventive interventions that prepare members of a population as ‘change agents’ to disseminate health in their social networks. We are currently testing interventions for in secondary schools for suicide prevention (Sources of Strength), substance use prevention (Above the Influence) and in military populations (Wingman-Connect). . These programs leverage the power of peer group social networks to strengthen skills for healthy coping, rising above negative influences, and building positive friendships and social connections. Our work is at the intersection of behavioral science, social network methods, training, and use of technology (e.g., text messaging) to extend the impact of intervention activities delivered in person.

Opportunities for undergraduate interns include working on a large New York State-funded project to disseminate the Sources of Strength suicide prevention program to schools in several regions. This project includes collecting data from each school on students’ participation and engagement in the program and preparing valuable school reports for each site to inform their work. Our team supports student teams and adults in the schools to implement messaging activities aimed at changing the norms that young people hold about getting through hard times and connecting with trusted adults for help. Our group is also launching a new NIH funded study to evaluate Above the Influence with a focus on reducing vaping. We are completing evaluation of a peer-led mental health promotion program we created for the USAF for airmen in training, with hopes to expand to other sites in the AF. We are looking to adapt this program possibly in other branches of the military or in a law enforcement environment.

Our team is excited to welcome an undergraduate intern who is enthusiastic about learning about conducting community-based research. Our interns are essential in helping us with the everyday tasks of conducting multi-site studies. They are welcome to join us during school trainings and school assessment periods when they have a full day open in their schedule. We welcome initiative, independence and inquisitiveness, while taking the responsibility to orient you and familiarize you with our work even through the small everyday support tasks.

  • Survey and program implementation preparation—gathering and organizing supplies needed for school assessments or training preparing mailings to schools/parents improving program materials
  • Data entry and analysis—gaining familiarity with online databases and survey tools
  • Community involvement—opportunities to be involved in the field with trainings and surveys (your schedule permitting not available in summer)
  • Scholarly work support—preparing literature reviews summarizing articles
  • Accountability, accuracy and enthusiasm—our interns are responsible to arrive in a timely fashion, give us advanced notice regarding schedule changes and be focused while at internship
  • Effective communication—interns are encouraged to inform us of their talents and goals and to communicate their struggles and needs.

If you are interested in learning more about the Sources of Strength program, please visit www.Sourcesofstrength.org.

Flexible schedule (4-8 hours per week). Close location (UR Medical Center). Learn about intervention research. Generally conducts interviews for internships in late March/April (for summer and fall positions), November, and sometimes August.

Contact: Karen Schmeelk-Cone, [email protected], (585) 275-6428

Social Cognitive Development Lab

Supervisor: Laura Elenbaas, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

The Social Cognitive Development Lab studies how children think about people and the social world. We are a collaborative group committed to understanding children's social experiences using theories and methods in developmental science. We are looking for highly motivated undergraduates to join our team as Research Assistants. 

Our RAs participate in all aspects of the research process, including working directly with children, recruiting families, participating in weekly lab meetings, managing data, and conducting literature searches. We work on-campus in Meliora Hall and off-campus at partner sites in the Rochester community.

RAs can earn up to 4 academic credits (PSY 395). Time commitments range from 5 to 10 hours per week. All RAs attend our lab meeting on Monday afternoons, and must have daytime availability at some point Monday-Friday for off-campus lab activities with children. We have a strong preference for RAs who are able to commit to 10 hours per week in the lab for two semesters.

Please visit our website to learn more about our work and apply for an RA position: http://scdlab.digitalscholar.rochester.edu. 

Contact: Kate Luken Raz, [email protected]

Social Development and Family Processes Lab

Supervisor: Judith Smetana, PhD
Recruiting for Summer and Fall 2021

Social Development and Family Processes Lab is looking for psychology majors who want to gain research experience in our lab. Students will assist with several ongoing research projects studying social and moral development with young children and adolescents.

-Assisting with data collection in research with children

-Participating in data preparation, coding, and/or analysis

-Learning about different research methods and becoming familiar with the research literature

Students can earn up to four credits per academic semester, requiring 10 hours/week of responsibilities. Students with flexible schedules with some daytime availability for data collection, a strong work ethic, and experience working with young children are preferred.

Contact: Esther Li, [email protected]

The Laboratory for Innovations in Child Mental Health Care Delivery

Supervisor: Linda Alpert-Gillis, PhD
Recruiting for Summer and Fall 2021

Description: The Laboratory for Innovations in Child Mental Health Care Delivery is based in the Child and Adolescent Division of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The research group has active research projects that focus on the development and evaluation of services within all settings in which intervention services are provided.

Current projects include: Emotional wellness screening of children enrolled in Primary Care Pediatrics Needs-based assessment for integrated behavioral health within Specialty Pediatrics Evaluation of a school-based mental health program Evaluation of a Multi-Family Group Model implemented at the child and adolescent clinic Evaluation of an Evidence-Based and Assessment Treatment Seminar attended by mental health providers.

Undergraduates also have the opportunity to participate in clinically oriented activities, including shadowing psychologists for individual or group therapy, observing diagnostic clinic, and conducting phone interviews with potential patients. Selected research assistants participate in a 4 credits independent study course that requires 10 hours/week of responsibilities. Non-credit summer opportunities are also available.

Contact: Dr. Linda Alpert-Gillis, [email protected]

Youth Risk and Resilience Lab

Supervisor: Catherine Glenn, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

The Youth Risk and Resilience Lab seeks highly motivated, conscientious individuals who are interested in gaining experience in clinical psychological science to join us as research assistants. Our research focuses on a range of self-harming behaviors in youth, including suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury. With a foundation in clinical psychological science, our lab is specifically interested in understanding the psychological processes that lead to suicidal and self-injurious behaviors, improving identification and prediction of these behaviors, and identifying modifiable targets for intervention and prevention.

RA duties include: participating in weekly lab meetings, conducting literature reviews, assisting with data entry and analysis, and helping to develop measures and collect data for several ongoing projects. As RAs gain more experience in the lab, they will have the opportunity to observe clinical interviews, assist with manuscripts and conference presentations, and potentially complete more intensive work in the lab, such as a senior honors thesis. We are looking for RAs who can devote 10-12 hours per week for course credit (UR undergraduates: 4 credits per academic semester) or as volunteers for at least 2 semesters. We are particularly interested in recruiting RAs who are able to make a longer-term commitment to the lab.


51 places to find research participants for your study

There are many ways to find the participant pools we need, from specialized services to social media, and even (gasp!) in person. By implementing a few different techniques and sampling from different pools, we can recruit participants with much more diverse demographics and surpass minimal sample sizes to provide statistical power to our research. Some methods might be perfectly suitable for a particular study whilst others could be absurdly ludicrous.

Important: Always seek advice and permission from your institutional review board or ethics committee before recruiting participants.

Anyway, enough preamble, let's get our brainstorming juices flowing.


INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL

Sam Hunter

Leadership and Innovation Lab (L.I.L)

Accepting applications for remote lab work Fall 2020

Our lab investigates the phenomenon of change. Leadership represents one of the key drivers of change and innovation represents the process of change. As Industrial and Organizational Psychologists, we take an applied perspective to science, seeking to build bridges between scientists and practitioners. We apply a number of techniques in our work, from engaging with companies to solve problems, to conducting controlled laboratory experiments, to content analyzing leader biographies. Our lab takes a highly developmental approach to working with undergraduates, supporting efforts such as applying to graduate school to discussing internship opportunities with companies. We are also a social bunch, having potlucks and an annual Lab Olympics event with our partner lab in engineering.

More information can be found here: www.hunter.la.psu.edu

Course credit and volunteer status: Research positions are available on a volunteer basis or in exchange for course credit (PSYCH 494). Students are expected to work a minimum of 6 – 9 hours a week (2 or 3 credit hours if working in the lab for course credit).

Requirements and qualifications: We seek motivated students with an interest in I-O Psychology and a career in the field. As we are a research-focused lab, preference is given for students seeking to attend graduate school. We seek to promote an inclusive environment and encourage students from all backgrounds to apply. Students can apply here: https://hunter.la.psu.edu/documents/LeadershipInnovationLabApplication.pdf


Types of Paid Online Research Studies

A medical study involves a group of people within an age group, gender, race, ethnic group, or individuals with the same specific health issues.

Participating in these studies often involves answering a combination of interviews, tests, surveys, or experimentation to be able to answer questions on how to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure health disorders and diseases.

Aside from paid medical studies, market research makes use of paid online research to find out what customers want or need from various products and companies.

The cool thing about paid online research studies available today is that even if you are not a part of the target audience, you can still participate in the study in another capacity.

Online research studies can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Quantitative studies are the ones with static, pre-planned answers. A questionnaire with multiple-choice answers is a good example of this study. It is made as such so that the researcher can easily analyze the results.

Qualitative studies are a bit more complex since it involves open-ended answers.

However, this type of study ends up with better data. Focus groups and interviews are both methods used in qualitative studies.


Where to post online psychology studies for participant recruitment? - Psychology

Research Assistant Positions for 2020-2021

    Clinical Research Coordinator positions at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

We are currently looking to hire two clinical research coordinators to assist with three NIMH-funded studies using computational methods to model neurocognitive markers and ambulatory indices (i.e., mobile technology including actigraphy, passive sensing of physiological arousal, and ecological momentary assessment) of short-term risk for suicidal behavior in adolescents. Research coordinators will work under the mentorship of Dr. Richard Liu at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. These positions are particularly well suited for individuals interested in gaining research and clinical experience prior to graduate or medical school. The start date is Summer 2021.

Additional information regarding these positions is available at: Clinical Research Coordinator (3147559)

Interested applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and CV through the link above. Posted March 2, 2021.


Volunteers

Have you ever wondered what goes on in a psychology lab? Well, now you can come and see for yourself. You will not only be contributing to science but you will also receive a modest monetary compensation for your time.

To find out what studies you can sign up to all you need to do is create a participant account in SONA, our research recruitment system. Then you will be able to:

  • Sign up for experiments with just a click
  • Choose the time slot that works best for you
  • Access the system 24/7 and while on the go through the SONA mobile app
  • Receive reminders of all the studies you have signed up to do the next day, so you won't miss any!
  • New studies will be added on a regular basis, please keep coming back to check for new experiments."

Th e Department of Psychology is now open for research. We have reviewed and implemented University guidance in line with Governmental advice to create a COVID-secure research environment.


Take this Quiz!

Research online yields big datasets, fast. But running an online study is not quite as simple as posting a survey and sitting back while the results roll in. Not many psychologists have trained in how to do an online study properly, Hartshorne says. So he has become a bit of an evangelist, traveling and speaking about the mistakes he’s learned the hard way, such as the time he posted a study for Japanese speakers, with monetary rewards, and ended up with participants who clearly didn’t understand Japanese at all.

First, researchers have to hook their potential participants. People love to take quizzes online, but researchers are competing with such popular frivolous offerings as “Which Disney princess are you?” “If you put up a website that’s boring, three people come in, then it’s just spiders,” Hartshorne says, referring to the automated webcrawlers that index sites. Some psychologists have reverse-engineered the clickbait traits of popular Facebook quizzes, and fit their studies to those parameters. For example, outofservice.com doesn’t say, “Take this standard personality test” it trumpets, “Find your Star Wars twin” or offers up similar questions in a questionnaire labeled “All About You—A Guide to Your Personality” (3).

For psychologists trained in traditional experimental settings, going online may be unsettling. “You’re giving up a lot of perception of control,” says Fred Sabb, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Oregon in Eugene. Under the watchful eye of a research assistant, subjects are likely to pay attention to their tasks. Far away on their computers or mobile phones, they might be concurrently watching a movie for all investigators know.

Researchers have ways to make sure subjects are focused on their tasks in the laboratory, and these are even more important online. “Catch trials” are questions that anyone who is paying attention should ace, such as, “Have you ever had a heart attack and died?” “Manipulation checks” ensure the person understood the instructions. For example, the screen might offer up what looks like a multiple-choice question, but the instructions say to click on the question title, not an answer. Researchers can also time the responses, because robot programs could be very fast and movie-watchers slow, and directly ask people if they were distracted. Because online studies net so many participants, researchers can liberally throw out suspect results while maintaining adequate sample size, Sabb points out.

Participants are often anonymous, which can help recruitment. Germine recently performed a study of how childhood traumas, such as sexual abuse, affected adult thought processes. She was worried she might not get many subjects, but netted 30,000. People were probably more likely to participate because they did not have to identify themselves or their family members, Germine surmises. In an analysis of a subset of those participants, she discovered that parental abuse correlated with certain deficiencies, such as trouble inferring the thoughts and feelings of another person (6). Previous work had reported children who faced traumas had a hard time understanding other people’s emotions Germine’s study showed those problems extend into adulthood.

That anonymity comes at a price. People can certainly lie in person, but in the laboratory, it’s often easy to tell if a volunteer doesn’t qualify for a study. Online, people who want to take studies or are financially compensated for doing so might be inclined to lie to make themselves look like perfect candidates. However, studies indicate that people online lie about as often as they do in person (7).

Researchers must carefully monitor their respondent pool to ensure the integrity of the data they collect. Image courtesy of Dave Cutler.


Social media has made it possible to easily and quickly advertise studies to large and heterogenous pools of participants around the world for both online and face-to-face research studies.

One of the pivotal aspects of planning a study is the calculation of the sample size (i.e. the number of participants in a sample). Ethics committees, journal reviewers and grant-awarding bodies are increasingly requesting that all research be supported by sample size estimation and power analysis in order to justify any study and its findings. Guidance on sample size requires that the number of participants recruited should be enough to achieve meaningful results, but should not be too high as to involve unnecessary recruitment and burdens to participants.

To perform sample size calculations, you can download and install GPower on your personal computer from the Universität Düsseldorf official website. GPower is a free and open source program widely used for sample size and power analyses calculations. It is available for both Windows and Mac.

Access GPower


51 places to find research participants for your study

There are many ways to find the participant pools we need, from specialized services to social media, and even (gasp!) in person. By implementing a few different techniques and sampling from different pools, we can recruit participants with much more diverse demographics and surpass minimal sample sizes to provide statistical power to our research. Some methods might be perfectly suitable for a particular study whilst others could be absurdly ludicrous.

Important: Always seek advice and permission from your institutional review board or ethics committee before recruiting participants.

Anyway, enough preamble, let's get our brainstorming juices flowing.


Research

We currently have a series of research projects available for ambitious undergraduate students that involve qualitative analysis, data entry, grant writing, participant recruitment, and physical and mental health in underserved female populations. Subsequently, there will be some quantitative data analysis and intervention fidelity assessment as well. Most of our research relates to domestic violence, motivation, and addiction in the court and clinical settings among justice-involved women.

Interns will engage with research staff, healthcare providers, community health workers, and research subjects to assist the efforts of the Women’s Initiative Supporting Health (W.I.S.H.) program, which is directed by Diane S. Morse, MD and housed within the Department of Psychiatry. Ideally, the internship would be 10-15 hours weekly, which could be flexible during exam or school break times. There is also the option of working with us for 4-hour course credit or during the summer. Opportunities for authorship on presentations and clinical experience are available to highly motivated individuals.

Educational benefits include: relevant training, weekly literature reviews, and mentorship for graduate school/medical school applications. Students able to make a two-semester commitment will be given preference. Apply 3 months in advance minimum.

Contact: Dr. Diane Morse, [email protected], (585) 275-6484

Internalizing Disorder and Emotional Adjustment Lab

Supervisor: Lisa R. Starr, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing for this project

Come join a fun, friendly, collaborative research lab!

Research assistants are wanted for research examining the etiology and consequences of depression and anxiety disorders in adolescence and adulthood in the Starr Lab. RAs will gain valuable research and clinical experience and will have the opportunity to be involved in the lab in a variety of ways: we ask our RAs to do everything from administrative tasks to performing literature reviews to conducting participant visits. Some RAs may have the opportunity to be trained on and conduct semi-structured interviews with adolescent participants, an experience that fosters both research and clinical skills.

We are looking for highly motivated, conscientious students with strong interpersonal skills and plenty of excitement about research on depression and related topics. This experience is particularly well-suited for students interested in eventually pursuing graduate studies in clinical psychology or a related field.

You can learn more about our labs interests and projects at our website psych.rochester.edu/research/starrlab. To apply, click on the "Join Us!" tab on our website and fill out an online application. Questions can be directed to [email protected]

Mt. Hope Family Center

Supervisors: Liz Handley, PhD Sheree Toth, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

The Mt. Hope Family Center is an internationally recognized Center for leading edge research on child maltreatment. Our team of psychologists, researchers, and clinicians work together to help improve the lives of children and families who have experienced violence, abuse, neglect, or trauma. Our work includes a number of large-scale federally funded research projects, as well as federally and locally funded clinical service. As such we are seeking hard-working and conscientious undergraduate students to join our team.

Research Assistant (RA) responsibilities may include participating in research meetings, and assisting with data collection, entry, and organization. We are looking for undergraduate RAs who can commit approximately 10-15 hours per week and can make a 2 semester commitment either for course credit or as a volunteer. Interested students should contact Stephanie Capobianco.

Contact: Stephanie Capobianco, [email protected]

Project BRIDGE: Parents & Teens

Supervisors: Melissa Sturge-Apple, PhD Patrick Davies, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing for this project

Project BRIDGE is a multidisciplinary study that examines parent-child relationships in early adolescence. Data collection has ended, but we are currently seeking research assistants to conduct coding in either observational or narrative systems. Students can receive up to four credits during academic semesters and an optional seminar component is available for students who wish to learn more about the implications and general theories of the project.

For more information, or to receive an application, please visit our web site at www.RochesterFamilyResearch.org.

Contact: Melissa Sturge-Apple, PhD, [email protected]

Project FLIGHT

Supervisor: Melissa Sturge-Apple, Ph.D.
Recruitment is ongoing

Project FLIGHT is a multidisciplinary study that examines how interparental conflict influences interactions within the parent-child relationship. We are currently seeking research assistants to conduct observational coding of child assessments. Students can earn up to four credits by enrolling in PSY 391 during academic semesters. In addition, an optional seminar component is available for students who wish to learn more about the implications and general theories of the project.

Contact: Zhi Li, Ph.D., [email protected]

Project PROMISE

Supervisors: Sheree Toth, PhD Jody Todd Manly, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Project PROMISE is a study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development led by Dr. Sheree Toth and Dr. Jody Todd Manly. PROMISE is a Community Partnered Participatory Research project with a clinical intervention that will follow pregnant moms and their infants until their child is 15 months old. PROMISE partners with community health programs that work with pregnant women and their babies in under-served populations to address barriers to care and social determinates of health. Some PROMISE families receive Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) through PROMISE. CPP is an evidence-based preventative therapy that is shown to improve parent-child relationships, prevent child maltreatment, and result in more sensitive parenting and healthier child development. Project PROMISE uses self-report measures, research interviews, observational paradigms, biological measures of stress, and birth outcomes to better understand who can benefit from CPP, when CPP is most effective, and, if under resource constraints, if a shorter therapeutic window can be helpful.

Interested undergraduate research assistants will be responsible for assisting with visits, entering and checking data, childcare, and transcription, with opportunities for remote work. Interns will commit to at least 8 hours per week, and at least 2 semesters, with the possibility to continue in subsequent semesters.

Internship opportunities with Project PROMISE focus on interns gaining applicable skills to their future interests and professional development. This internship is fit for students interested in child development, infancy and pregnancy, maternal and infant health, clinical psychology, and/or developmental psychology, who wish to gain research experience, and hope to grow under a Research Assistant mentor system.

Students can earn up to 4 credit hours per semester for their work on this project by enrolling in PSYC 391.

Contact: Project PROMISE, [email protected], (585) 275-2991 x233

Project STEP

Supervisor: Patrick Davies, PhD, & Melissa Sturge-Apple, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Project STEP is a study that examines the coping and adjustment of preschoolers who have experienced different levels of interparental discord.

Undergraduate research assistants who join our lab will have the opportunity to evaluate interviews or observations and learn to implement systems for evaluating family adversity, family support, and children's coping with family stress. An optional seminar component is available for students who wish to learn more about the implications and general theories of the project.

Students can earn up to 4 credit hours per semester for their work on this project by enrolling in either PSY377 or PSY391.

Contact: Morgan Thompson, [email protected]

Project THRIVE

Supervisor: Patrick Davies, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Project THRIVE is a study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development led by Dr. Patrick Davies. We are interested in understanding how and why constructive family relationships and forms of conflict increase children's mental health and well-being during the preschool and early elementary school years. Through questionnaires, interaction tasks with family members, interviews, games with children, and physiological measures (eyetracking, EKG, and cortisol analysis), we hope to better understand the mechanisms and pathways linking interparental and parent-child relationships with children's psychological adjustment.

Interested undergraduate research assistants will be responsible for assisting with visits recording tasks, data uploading, coding, childcare, and recruitment. There will also be opportunities for professional development and research presentations. Interns will be required to dedicate up to 10 hours a week to their internship, which includes time at Mount Hope as well as related outside work, such as assigned readings.

The commitment to our project has a two semester minimum, with a possibility to continue in subsequent semesters. The internship opportunity with Project THRIVE focuses on the intern gaining applicable skills to their future interests and developing as a professional. This internship is fit for students who have interests in child development, family interactions, and/or developmental psychopathology, wish to gain research experience, and hope to grow as a professional under a Research Assistant mentor system.

Students can earn up to 4 credit hours per semester for their work on this project by enrolling in either PSY377 or PSY391.

Contact: Meera Patel, [email protected], (585) 275-2991 x 195

Research in Multiple Areas of Social Psychology

Supervisor: Miron Zuckerman, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

Research assistants are needed for research on religiosity, self-esteem, self-enhancement, health, and other topics within and related to the field of social psychology. Assistants help with a wide variety of tasks, and are encouraged to get involved at every level of the research process.

Contact: Miron Zuckerman, PhD, [email protected]

Research on Achievement and Social Motivation

Supervisor: Andrew J. Elliot, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

We conduct research on why people behave the way they do in achievement situations (e.g., school, sports, work) and social situations. Our lab is quite diverse, usually comprising visiting professors and post-doctoral students from around the globe, as well as graduate students and undergraduate research assistants from the UR. 

We are always looking for interested, hard-working undergraduates to participate in all phases of the research process, beginning with data collection (subject running) and moving toward more full collaboration (including honor's theses and other writing projects).

Contact: Aleza Wallace, [email protected]

Research on Social Interaction and Close Relationships

Supervisor: Harry Reis, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

We conduct research on social interaction and close relationships. We welcome participation by students as research assistants.

Typically, students may expect to conduct any or all of several activities, including running experimental sessions, supervising Internet-based protocols, interviewing participants, coding open-ended responses, and data entry.

Contact: Harry Reis, [email protected]

School and Community Based Prevention Program

Supervisor: Peter A. Wyman, PhD
Recruiting is ongoing for this project.

Our research group focuses on developing and testing preventive interventions that prepare members of a population as ‘change agents’ to disseminate health in their social networks. We are currently testing interventions for in secondary schools for suicide prevention (Sources of Strength), substance use prevention (Above the Influence) and in military populations (Wingman-Connect). . These programs leverage the power of peer group social networks to strengthen skills for healthy coping, rising above negative influences, and building positive friendships and social connections. Our work is at the intersection of behavioral science, social network methods, training, and use of technology (e.g., text messaging) to extend the impact of intervention activities delivered in person.

Opportunities for undergraduate interns include working on a large New York State-funded project to disseminate the Sources of Strength suicide prevention program to schools in several regions. This project includes collecting data from each school on students’ participation and engagement in the program and preparing valuable school reports for each site to inform their work. Our team supports student teams and adults in the schools to implement messaging activities aimed at changing the norms that young people hold about getting through hard times and connecting with trusted adults for help. Our group is also launching a new NIH funded study to evaluate Above the Influence with a focus on reducing vaping. We are completing evaluation of a peer-led mental health promotion program we created for the USAF for airmen in training, with hopes to expand to other sites in the AF. We are looking to adapt this program possibly in other branches of the military or in a law enforcement environment.

Our team is excited to welcome an undergraduate intern who is enthusiastic about learning about conducting community-based research. Our interns are essential in helping us with the everyday tasks of conducting multi-site studies. They are welcome to join us during school trainings and school assessment periods when they have a full day open in their schedule. We welcome initiative, independence and inquisitiveness, while taking the responsibility to orient you and familiarize you with our work even through the small everyday support tasks.

  • Survey and program implementation preparation—gathering and organizing supplies needed for school assessments or training preparing mailings to schools/parents improving program materials
  • Data entry and analysis—gaining familiarity with online databases and survey tools
  • Community involvement—opportunities to be involved in the field with trainings and surveys (your schedule permitting not available in summer)
  • Scholarly work support—preparing literature reviews summarizing articles
  • Accountability, accuracy and enthusiasm—our interns are responsible to arrive in a timely fashion, give us advanced notice regarding schedule changes and be focused while at internship
  • Effective communication—interns are encouraged to inform us of their talents and goals and to communicate their struggles and needs.

If you are interested in learning more about the Sources of Strength program, please visit www.Sourcesofstrength.org.

Flexible schedule (4-8 hours per week). Close location (UR Medical Center). Learn about intervention research. Generally conducts interviews for internships in late March/April (for summer and fall positions), November, and sometimes August.

Contact: Karen Schmeelk-Cone, [email protected], (585) 275-6428

Social Cognitive Development Lab

Supervisor: Laura Elenbaas, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

The Social Cognitive Development Lab studies how children think about people and the social world. We are a collaborative group committed to understanding children's social experiences using theories and methods in developmental science. We are looking for highly motivated undergraduates to join our team as Research Assistants. 

Our RAs participate in all aspects of the research process, including working directly with children, recruiting families, participating in weekly lab meetings, managing data, and conducting literature searches. We work on-campus in Meliora Hall and off-campus at partner sites in the Rochester community.

RAs can earn up to 4 academic credits (PSY 395). Time commitments range from 5 to 10 hours per week. All RAs attend our lab meeting on Monday afternoons, and must have daytime availability at some point Monday-Friday for off-campus lab activities with children. We have a strong preference for RAs who are able to commit to 10 hours per week in the lab for two semesters.

Please visit our website to learn more about our work and apply for an RA position: http://scdlab.digitalscholar.rochester.edu. 

Contact: Kate Luken Raz, [email protected]

Social Development and Family Processes Lab

Supervisor: Judith Smetana, PhD
Recruiting for Summer and Fall 2021

Social Development and Family Processes Lab is looking for psychology majors who want to gain research experience in our lab. Students will assist with several ongoing research projects studying social and moral development with young children and adolescents.

-Assisting with data collection in research with children

-Participating in data preparation, coding, and/or analysis

-Learning about different research methods and becoming familiar with the research literature

Students can earn up to four credits per academic semester, requiring 10 hours/week of responsibilities. Students with flexible schedules with some daytime availability for data collection, a strong work ethic, and experience working with young children are preferred.

Contact: Esther Li, [email protected]

The Laboratory for Innovations in Child Mental Health Care Delivery

Supervisor: Linda Alpert-Gillis, PhD
Recruiting for Summer and Fall 2021

Description: The Laboratory for Innovations in Child Mental Health Care Delivery is based in the Child and Adolescent Division of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The research group has active research projects that focus on the development and evaluation of services within all settings in which intervention services are provided.

Current projects include: Emotional wellness screening of children enrolled in Primary Care Pediatrics Needs-based assessment for integrated behavioral health within Specialty Pediatrics Evaluation of a school-based mental health program Evaluation of a Multi-Family Group Model implemented at the child and adolescent clinic Evaluation of an Evidence-Based and Assessment Treatment Seminar attended by mental health providers.

Undergraduates also have the opportunity to participate in clinically oriented activities, including shadowing psychologists for individual or group therapy, observing diagnostic clinic, and conducting phone interviews with potential patients. Selected research assistants participate in a 4 credits independent study course that requires 10 hours/week of responsibilities. Non-credit summer opportunities are also available.

Contact: Dr. Linda Alpert-Gillis, [email protected]

Youth Risk and Resilience Lab

Supervisor: Catherine Glenn, PhD
Recruitment is ongoing

The Youth Risk and Resilience Lab seeks highly motivated, conscientious individuals who are interested in gaining experience in clinical psychological science to join us as research assistants. Our research focuses on a range of self-harming behaviors in youth, including suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury. With a foundation in clinical psychological science, our lab is specifically interested in understanding the psychological processes that lead to suicidal and self-injurious behaviors, improving identification and prediction of these behaviors, and identifying modifiable targets for intervention and prevention.

RA duties include: participating in weekly lab meetings, conducting literature reviews, assisting with data entry and analysis, and helping to develop measures and collect data for several ongoing projects. As RAs gain more experience in the lab, they will have the opportunity to observe clinical interviews, assist with manuscripts and conference presentations, and potentially complete more intensive work in the lab, such as a senior honors thesis. We are looking for RAs who can devote 10-12 hours per week for course credit (UR undergraduates: 4 credits per academic semester) or as volunteers for at least 2 semesters. We are particularly interested in recruiting RAs who are able to make a longer-term commitment to the lab.


Best practices checklist

Stand out with an effective headline

User testing has shown that this is the most important part of the flyer. Headlines should:

  • Catch the attention of your target audience. If your flyer is hanging on a wall among dozens of others, what would make it stand out?
  • Avoid generic language such as, “Research study seeking participants”
  • Clearly state the purpose of the research study. For example: “Is your current antidepressant not helping your mood?” “Do you have asthma?” “Have you given birth in the past 6 months?”

Include mandatory IRB details

The templates include room for the mandatory details as designated by the IRB:

  • Condensed study title
  • Purpose of the study
  • Protocol summary
  • Basic eligibility criteria
  • Study site location(s)
  • How to contact the study site for more information

Include these mandatory details in as succinct a fashion as possible (see example templates). By including these details, you ensure individuals are contacting you because (1) they qualify for the study and (2) they have enough information to make an informed decision about deciding to participate. This saves time for both the researcher and the potential participant.

Tailor your message to your audience

Keep it simple and concise. Many people find it difficult to retain a lot of written information.

  • Did you know that participants are interested in research studies that are beneficial to their communities? Think about how your study will benefit the people you are trying to recruit and include that information on your recruitment materials. Unsure of the benefits? Consider including members of the community or your target population in study planning and development of recruitment materials.
  • Did you know that the average reading level in Alachua County is middle school, and that people who cannot comprehend the information presented in recruitment are less likely to participate in clinical studies? Consider how you would explain your study to a neighbor, and make sure the information on the flyer passes the “small-talk test.”

You can use these tools to help write participant-friendly recruitment messages:

    offers guidelines and resources to help you create easy-to-read health materials. : Enter medical terms and view alternative phrasing to simplify the description.

Select an engaging image

Photos and images can draw more interest from potential participants. Make sure images are:

  • Relevant to your study and represent your target audience (e.g., includes older adults if recruiting for an aging study)
  • High-quality (i.e., large file size that will display well, not pixelated, in print). Image should be at least 600 x 600 pixels.
  • Yours to use on the flyer (i.e. you created the image and have permission from photo subjects, or you have rights to use a photo that you did not take, and you properly credit the image according to terms of use)

You can find FREE stock photos on these websites:

Format your content

Format matters, especially to readability: The text boxes within the templates are sized for maximum effectiveness. Keep it simple and concise!

  • Having trouble fitting all of your information on the flyer? Try condensing the content.
  • Use bulleted lists to break up content and optimize readability
  • Do not adjust the margins to fit more content
  • Do not decrease the font below 10 points

Use the correct branding and logo

When do you use the UF brand vs. the UF Health brand? That depends. UF Health brand and logo


Social media has made it possible to easily and quickly advertise studies to large and heterogenous pools of participants around the world for both online and face-to-face research studies.

One of the pivotal aspects of planning a study is the calculation of the sample size (i.e. the number of participants in a sample). Ethics committees, journal reviewers and grant-awarding bodies are increasingly requesting that all research be supported by sample size estimation and power analysis in order to justify any study and its findings. Guidance on sample size requires that the number of participants recruited should be enough to achieve meaningful results, but should not be too high as to involve unnecessary recruitment and burdens to participants.

To perform sample size calculations, you can download and install GPower on your personal computer from the Universität Düsseldorf official website. GPower is a free and open source program widely used for sample size and power analyses calculations. It is available for both Windows and Mac.

Access GPower


Take this Quiz!

Research online yields big datasets, fast. But running an online study is not quite as simple as posting a survey and sitting back while the results roll in. Not many psychologists have trained in how to do an online study properly, Hartshorne says. So he has become a bit of an evangelist, traveling and speaking about the mistakes he’s learned the hard way, such as the time he posted a study for Japanese speakers, with monetary rewards, and ended up with participants who clearly didn’t understand Japanese at all.

First, researchers have to hook their potential participants. People love to take quizzes online, but researchers are competing with such popular frivolous offerings as “Which Disney princess are you?” “If you put up a website that’s boring, three people come in, then it’s just spiders,” Hartshorne says, referring to the automated webcrawlers that index sites. Some psychologists have reverse-engineered the clickbait traits of popular Facebook quizzes, and fit their studies to those parameters. For example, outofservice.com doesn’t say, “Take this standard personality test” it trumpets, “Find your Star Wars twin” or offers up similar questions in a questionnaire labeled “All About You—A Guide to Your Personality” (3).

For psychologists trained in traditional experimental settings, going online may be unsettling. “You’re giving up a lot of perception of control,” says Fred Sabb, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Oregon in Eugene. Under the watchful eye of a research assistant, subjects are likely to pay attention to their tasks. Far away on their computers or mobile phones, they might be concurrently watching a movie for all investigators know.

Researchers have ways to make sure subjects are focused on their tasks in the laboratory, and these are even more important online. “Catch trials” are questions that anyone who is paying attention should ace, such as, “Have you ever had a heart attack and died?” “Manipulation checks” ensure the person understood the instructions. For example, the screen might offer up what looks like a multiple-choice question, but the instructions say to click on the question title, not an answer. Researchers can also time the responses, because robot programs could be very fast and movie-watchers slow, and directly ask people if they were distracted. Because online studies net so many participants, researchers can liberally throw out suspect results while maintaining adequate sample size, Sabb points out.

Participants are often anonymous, which can help recruitment. Germine recently performed a study of how childhood traumas, such as sexual abuse, affected adult thought processes. She was worried she might not get many subjects, but netted 30,000. People were probably more likely to participate because they did not have to identify themselves or their family members, Germine surmises. In an analysis of a subset of those participants, she discovered that parental abuse correlated with certain deficiencies, such as trouble inferring the thoughts and feelings of another person (6). Previous work had reported children who faced traumas had a hard time understanding other people’s emotions Germine’s study showed those problems extend into adulthood.

That anonymity comes at a price. People can certainly lie in person, but in the laboratory, it’s often easy to tell if a volunteer doesn’t qualify for a study. Online, people who want to take studies or are financially compensated for doing so might be inclined to lie to make themselves look like perfect candidates. However, studies indicate that people online lie about as often as they do in person (7).

Researchers must carefully monitor their respondent pool to ensure the integrity of the data they collect. Image courtesy of Dave Cutler.


INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL

Sam Hunter

Leadership and Innovation Lab (L.I.L)

Accepting applications for remote lab work Fall 2020

Our lab investigates the phenomenon of change. Leadership represents one of the key drivers of change and innovation represents the process of change. As Industrial and Organizational Psychologists, we take an applied perspective to science, seeking to build bridges between scientists and practitioners. We apply a number of techniques in our work, from engaging with companies to solve problems, to conducting controlled laboratory experiments, to content analyzing leader biographies. Our lab takes a highly developmental approach to working with undergraduates, supporting efforts such as applying to graduate school to discussing internship opportunities with companies. We are also a social bunch, having potlucks and an annual Lab Olympics event with our partner lab in engineering.

More information can be found here: www.hunter.la.psu.edu

Course credit and volunteer status: Research positions are available on a volunteer basis or in exchange for course credit (PSYCH 494). Students are expected to work a minimum of 6 – 9 hours a week (2 or 3 credit hours if working in the lab for course credit).

Requirements and qualifications: We seek motivated students with an interest in I-O Psychology and a career in the field. As we are a research-focused lab, preference is given for students seeking to attend graduate school. We seek to promote an inclusive environment and encourage students from all backgrounds to apply. Students can apply here: https://hunter.la.psu.edu/documents/LeadershipInnovationLabApplication.pdf


Types of Paid Online Research Studies

A medical study involves a group of people within an age group, gender, race, ethnic group, or individuals with the same specific health issues.

Participating in these studies often involves answering a combination of interviews, tests, surveys, or experimentation to be able to answer questions on how to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure health disorders and diseases.

Aside from paid medical studies, market research makes use of paid online research to find out what customers want or need from various products and companies.

The cool thing about paid online research studies available today is that even if you are not a part of the target audience, you can still participate in the study in another capacity.

Online research studies can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Quantitative studies are the ones with static, pre-planned answers. A questionnaire with multiple-choice answers is a good example of this study. It is made as such so that the researcher can easily analyze the results.

Qualitative studies are a bit more complex since it involves open-ended answers.

However, this type of study ends up with better data. Focus groups and interviews are both methods used in qualitative studies.


Where to post online psychology studies for participant recruitment? - Psychology

Research Assistant Positions for 2020-2021

    Clinical Research Coordinator positions at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

We are currently looking to hire two clinical research coordinators to assist with three NIMH-funded studies using computational methods to model neurocognitive markers and ambulatory indices (i.e., mobile technology including actigraphy, passive sensing of physiological arousal, and ecological momentary assessment) of short-term risk for suicidal behavior in adolescents. Research coordinators will work under the mentorship of Dr. Richard Liu at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. These positions are particularly well suited for individuals interested in gaining research and clinical experience prior to graduate or medical school. The start date is Summer 2021.

Additional information regarding these positions is available at: Clinical Research Coordinator (3147559)

Interested applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and CV through the link above. Posted March 2, 2021.


Volunteers

Have you ever wondered what goes on in a psychology lab? Well, now you can come and see for yourself. You will not only be contributing to science but you will also receive a modest monetary compensation for your time.

To find out what studies you can sign up to all you need to do is create a participant account in SONA, our research recruitment system. Then you will be able to:

  • Sign up for experiments with just a click
  • Choose the time slot that works best for you
  • Access the system 24/7 and while on the go through the SONA mobile app
  • Receive reminders of all the studies you have signed up to do the next day, so you won't miss any!
  • New studies will be added on a regular basis, please keep coming back to check for new experiments."

Th e Department of Psychology is now open for research. We have reviewed and implemented University guidance in line with Governmental advice to create a COVID-secure research environment.


Watch the video: Lokalna partnerstva za zapošljavanje u BiH: Program osposobljavanja drvnu industriju (January 2022).