Information

Introductory resources on developmental psychology/neuroscience

Introductory resources on developmental psychology/neuroscience

I'd like to be able to answer questions such as:

  • What neuro/psychological functions underly competences such as empathy (or others - see background below)?
  • What neurotransmitters are of particular importance in those functions?
  • What genes are known to be associated with those neurotransmitters?

Any suggestions on textbooks or review papers that would be a good starting point?


Background

I'm an M.Sc. student in epidemiology (with a psychology undergrad) and my thesis is on "gene x environment" interactions (GxE). The outcome I'm interested in is child competence (construct which can be subdivided in subcomponents such as compliance, attention & empathy) at 18 months. The main environmental predictor is mother sensitivity.

I now need to focus on some specific genes and would like to be able to choose those with a clear rationale (rather than, say, search through the literature to find the most commonly studied genes); However, at this point I lack the knowledge required to do so.


For an introduction to neurotransmitters (and the field of neuroscience) a good book to start with is Principles of Neural Science (Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, 2000). It is a standard reference used by many undergraduate and graduate courses in neuroscience/related fields. The next edition is due for publication in October. During development neurotransmitters act different than in adults, so you may also be interested on a review in this topic (Herlenius & Lagercrantz, 2004); Although the time frame is earlier than what you are looking at.

In general I think you should start off by looking for possible neural mechanisms and any associated brain regions underlying the specific phenomenon you are interested in (in your example, empathy, or other subcomponents of social-emotional competence measured by the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (Carter et al., 2003)). I.e. Singer (2006) reviews the neural basis of empathy (as well as Theory of Mind); one section talks about implications for development.

After knowing what brain regions to focus on, you can look into anatomical/physiological research for better understanding of cellular type/structure, connectivity, synaptic characteristics, and neurotransmitters specific to these regions as well as genes that may affect normal function of a transmitter (i.e genes that control protein channels, enzymes/transmitter metabolism etc.). Here are two newer reviews, which link empathy to neuronal circuits and genes (Chakrabarti et al., 2009; Walter, 2012).


Developmental psych

The options are a chance for the students to apply their understanding of concepts from the core of the course. SL candidates must study one option HL candidates must study two. Each option has three "topics." The exam will give them three questions to choose from - they will choose one to write a well-developed essay in one hour. Each question comes from one of the three topics. There may not be two questions from.

To access the entire contents of this site, you need to log in or subscribe to it.


Developmental Psychology

The program in Developmental Psychology is designed to prepare skilled, creative developmental psychologists who are sensitive to issues of practical significance and trained to conduct and apply sound, meaningful social science research. An important strength of our program is the diversity of research skills, perspectives, and findings we bring to bear on a subject of central human concerns.

The program in Developmental Psychology is highly respected both nationally and internationally and covers all portions of the life-span from infancy to late life. Nineteen Core faculty, and other affiliated faculty, offer collaborative research training in social, cognitive, linguistic and brain development. Special strengths of the program include opportunities for training in:

  • Basic and applied research
    longitudinal methods
  • Developmental neuroscience
  • Development in the context of schools
  • Family and community influences on the life course
  • Including research with both normal and at-risk populations

The program has a strong tradition in interdisciplinary research and cross-cultural studies, and maintains active ties with outstanding programs around the world.

The Developmental Area also has a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development T32 Training Grant in Developmental Psychology. The Training Grant offers graduate and postdoctoral fellowships. Students are trained in interdisciplinary developmental science that brings together the fields of social context and neuroscience.

To Apply to the Developmental Psychology Program

The Department Psychology admits students only once each year for the fall term. To apply, you must complete the official online Rackham Graduate Application form. When completing this form you will have the opportunity to upload your Personal Statement, Statement of Purpose, and transcripts. You will also be prompted to register your recommenders, so that they will be able to submit their letters of recommendation online. All applicants who are applying to the Psychology Graduate Program should review the Psychology Department Graduate Application Checklist. Please do not send any hard copy materials to the Psychology Department.

For specific questions about the graduate program in Developmental Psychology, contact the Program Chair: Susan Gelman

For matriculation in Fall 2022, the deadline for submission of your application is December 1, 2021. Recruitment weekend will be February 18-19, 2022. All applicants are notified of admission decisions by April 1, 2022 or earlier.


On-line development psychology course materials, video and audio resources

Developmental Psychology.Org The teaching resources were created by those who teach Developmental Psychology or a related topic. Every resource is designed to help instructors make their classes as engaging and thought provoking as possible. Some resources are class activities, summaries, figures, hour-long lesson plans, and snippets to augment longer lesson plans. You may also consider submitting your best teaching ideas.

Learning & Teaching Developmental Psychology: Study psychological research and theory about children's social and cognitive development with resources like lesson plans, classroom activities, and web links.

The following teaching resources were created by those who teach Developmental Psychology or a related topic. Every resource is designed to help instructors make their classes as engaging and thought provoking as possible. Some resources are class activities, summaries, figures, hour-long lesson plans, and snippets to augment longer lesson plans.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology has on-line course materials for Developmental Psychology in the section of Brain and Cognitive Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

Seasons of Life is a series of instructional video in developmental psychology for college and high school students 5 one-hour video programs and 26 half-hour audio programs. The programs are an introduction to developmental psychology from conception through old age. The series explores the biological, psychological, and social "clocks" of life-span. Psychologists, sociologists, biologists, and anthropologists present theory, methods, and research. Real individuals from diverse backgrounds talk about the significant events in their lives.

Growing Old in a New Age is a series of 13 one-hour video programs on aging for college and high school students. The programs show the impact of aging on both society and individuals as diverse elders relate their experiences. The four ways that age is measured — chronologically, biologically, psychologically, and socially — are the basis for discussing the quality of life in later years. The programs examine common misconceptions about aging and provides a springboard for analyzing new roles for elders, intergenerational alliances, resource allocation, and artificial attempts to prolong life.

Death: A Personal Understanding is a series of 10 half-hour video programs on death and dying for college and high school students. The programs give a greater understanding of death and dying through case studies and moving personal stories of people facing their own death or the death of a loved one. The programs explore a wide range of North American cultural perspectives on death within the context of current issues, including AIDS, death by violence, suicide, assisted suicide, hospice care, end-of-life decision making, and how children react to death.

Developmental Psychology at Films on Demand: Digital Educational Video: Films On Demand is the web-based digital video delivery service that allows to view streaming videos from Films Media Group anytime, anywhere, 24/7. More than 5,500 educational titles in various subject areas. They have 144 films on Developmental Psychology (by September 11, 2010).

Films On Demand delivers high-quality digital video for students and faculty through online catalogs, distance learning courses and learning management systems. The films are available in full or by short segments. Special features allow users the ability to organize and bookmark clips, share playlists, personalize folders and manage the entire collection through an administrative reporting system.

PsychSim 5.0, developed by Thomas Ludwig, is a set of web-based interactive tutorials on various topics of Psychology. Those related to Developmental Psychology are:

This activity describes Piaget’s theory of the growth of intelligence and simulates the performance of three children of different ages on some of Piaget’s tasks.

This activity helps understand the sequence of prenatal development.

This activity helps understand Erik Erikson’s perspective on identity formation, as well as James Marcia’s four steps or stages in the identity process.


Developmental psychology

In this unit, we look at how children change over time. Specifically, we look at how their cognitive abilities develop, as well as their sense of identity. In addition to looking at how children develop over time, we also will look at factors that affect their development - including poverty, adverse childhood experiences, and culture.textEssential questionstextKey skillstext

To access the entire contents of this site, you need to log in or subscribe to it.


Program Objectives

By graduation, you will have:

  • Completed courses that provide critical training in the intellectual pursuit of advanced knowledge in educational, social, and behavioral sciences
  • Participated in research apprenticeships with Graduate Faculty in the School of Education
  • Faculty mentoring that allows you to author and/or co-author publications and presentations at national and international conferences
  • Preparation for academic and administrative positions in educational institutions and social service agencies

Community & Collaboration

Throughout the academic calendar, Dr. Marcus Johnson hosts special events for his large lecture Human Development courses, inviting guests from various disciplines to speak to his students on a diverse array of subjects pertinent to Human Development (i.e. developmental criminology, pediatrics, current research on play, geriatrics, hospice services, etc.). In April 2013, Dr. Johnson hosted a panel of speakers with expertise in secondary and post-secondary education. Jenni Jacobs is an instructor for online courses offered through the School of Education and provided insights into the attitudes and behaviors of "nontraditional" college students. Katie Kemme is an English teacher at Hughes High School and responded to students inquiries about what makes educational professions worthwhile and fulfilling. UC's own Dr. Chet Laine and Dr. Helen Meyer from the secondary education faculty also participated as panelists, sharing their philosophies and approaches to teacher education, as well as providing practical advice for those interested in education professions.

In May 2011, the Center hosted a day-long Summit on Transactions between Research and Practice in the Developmental and Learning Sciences with researchers at UC and Children's Hospital, graduate students, and teachers and other members of the education community. Speakers included: Dr. Dennis Molfese, a co-director of the NIH Reading & Learning Disabilities Research Network and Director of the Brain Imaging Center and Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Nebraska Dr. Victoria Molfese, Chancellor's Professor of Child, Youth & Family Studies at the University of Nebraska who spoke on their research in early identification of infants and young children at risk for developing language and reading disabilities and the effect of early intervention. Dr. Gregory K. Martin, Academic Dean and director of Pedagogical Growth and Development at the Cincinnati Country Day School and Dr. Jeremiah McCall, author of Gaming the Past: Using Video Games to Teach Secondary Students spoke on their work on 21st century teaching and learning, the changes nature of the classroom, the nature of play in education, and the use of games as learning tools.


Books by Sarah

Sarah’s most recent book, Building Sensorimotor Systems in Children with Developmental Trauma: A Model for Practice,can be found on Amazon here.

Sarah’s first book, Improving Sensory Processing in Traumatised Children, was published by JKP in 2016, and can be found on Amazon here.

Both are available on Amazon or from the publisher. We hold a small number in stock, so if you’re having difficulty getting hold of a copy, just let us know.

Brian Rock, Dean of the Tavistock Clinic, wrote in the the foreword to ‘Building Underdeveloped Sensorimotor System in Children with Developmental Trauma: A Model for Practice’:

“She brings concepts and ideas together, drawing on what appear to be antithetical traditions, in the service of providing an accessible and effective set of interventions that make a real difference to people’s lives. Here there is much innovation and development for which we should be grateful.”


Developmental

About us
Faculty and students in the developmental program focus on the interrelationships of biological and behavioral processes throughout the life span, and on the mechanisms and processes of change. Because student studying developmental psychology are focused on the development of some domain (such as language, emotion, cognition, personality, or well-being) the program emphasizes interdisciplinary studies, and allows graduate students tremendous flexibility in designing their own program of study consonant with their goals and interests.

Our Approach
The developmental program embraces diversity among our students, our methods, and our scientific approaches. The faculty are equally divided among those whose laboratories emphasize experimental and quasi-experimental techniques to uncover developmental mechanisms, and those who emphasize “big data” and longitudinal techniques to understand developmental trajectories. Our associated research groups cover all age spans, including infancy, early childhood, adolescence, adults, and the elderly.

Martha Alibali’s research group uses a range of experimental and observational methods, including laboratory experiments, gesture studies, and observations in educational settings. Hill Goldsmith and his students use longitudinal behavioral genetic methods applied to behavioral and biological data. Janet Hyde’s lab group uses both large, longitudinal data sets as well as meta-analytic techniques. Students working with Seth Pollak use a variety of neuroscientific methods such as ERP, neuroimaging, hormonal, and epigenetics. Carol Ryff uses longitudinal and, and cross-cultural designs with population-based samples on which extensive psychological, social, and biological data are collected. Jenny Saffran’s laboratory uses a variety of experimental approaches, including eye-tracking, to study infants. Kristin Shutts’ lab uses cognitive-science based techniques to address issues about social development.

Our Research
Our breadth in methodologies is paralleled by breadth across several domains of behavior. Specific faculty research interests include the development of mathematical reasoning and problem solving, development of visuospatial cognition, development of social cognition, interaction of cognitive and motor development in symbolic reasoning, temperament and affective development, gender role development, developmental psychopathology, effects of stress on development, resiliency in adulthood and aging, and language acquisition.

Our strength is enhanced by extremely rich relationships between the developmental area group and the Institute on Aging, the Waisman Center, and the Wisconsin Center for Education Research. We have fully state-of-the-art laboratory facilities, enhanced by unique opportunities for training in neuroimaging at the Waisman Center.

The training program
Students within our program focus on cognitive, emotional, language, perceptual, personality, social development, or relations between these areas. Within these content domains, students and faculty conduct research on both typical and atypical development, and work with individuals representing a wide range of ages, including infants, preschool and school age children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly. Every student enters the program with a primary advisor and conducts an important piece of original research during their very first year in Madison. We use this First Year Project as the student’s launching pad to research excellence. During the Fall Semester of the second year, students share their work with all of the faculty and students in the department. Also during your first year, students and their mentor will develop an individualized educational plan. This personalized curriculum, which is then discussed and approved by all area faculty, ensures that each student achieves breadth across domains of development, as well as cross-disciplinary depth in an area of interest to the student.

Many of the faculty collaborate with one another, and these collaborations often begin with a student’s interest. Therefore we encourage prospective students to contact our faculty directly to share your ideas prior to submitting an application.

DEVELOPMENTAL FACULTY

Martha Alibali
I conduct research at the interface of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, and mathematics education.

Hill Goldsmith
The focus of our laboratories in the Psychology Department and at the Waisman Center is the development of childhood psychopathology and developmental disabilities.

Janet Hyde
My research falls in the areas of psychology of women, human sexuality, and gender-role development.

James Li
My research examines the interplay between genes and environments that contribute to the development of child externalizing problems.

Seth Pollak
I am a developmental psychopathologist. My students and I are interested in understanding the mechanisms through which children’s experiences increase biobehavioral development and vulnerability for behavioral disorders.

Carol Ryff
psychological well-being, resilience, biological and brain mechanisms linking psychosocial factors to health, socioeconomic and cultural influences on health

Jenny Saffran
Language development, statistical learning, lexical processing, music perception, atypical development

Kristin Shutts Social cognitive development attitudes and stereotypes social and cultural learning


Developmental, Social, and Health

Welcome to our page for the Developmental, Social, and Health program of the Department of Psychology! Within our program, there are several available tracks for PhD students to pursue in their research, coursework, and program requirements. Students may choose to focus on one or more tracks (e.g., Social or Developmental or Health, or Social and Developmental, etc.). Note: Students interested in the Health Psychology track should explore more about our interdisciplinary "Health Psychology Concentration" for PhD students: https://psychology.as.uky.edu/health-psychology-concentration

In the Developmental, Social, Health program, students typically receive primary conceptual and methodological training in Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, OR Health Psychology (each are “tracks” within our program). This training will reflect the expertise of your advisor (and lab) in their respective subfield (e.g., Social Psychology) and will prepare you for the academic job market in this subfield.

As some faculty in the Developmental, Social, and Health program are truly “hybrid” psychologists (equivalent expertise in Social and Developmental Psychology, for example), you may also, if you so choose, gear your training across subfields by pursuing relevant coursework, research collaborations, teaching experiences, etc. We understand that Psychology is increasingly integrative across topic areas, which is one of the features of our collaborative Developmental, Social, and Health program. As part of our program, we encourage you to complete the requirements of your training in ways that maximize your professional development, career goals, and interests.

Our goals are to inspire you to reach your highest potential and to fulfill our responsibility as faculty by giving you the best training possible. We seek to prepare students in our graduate program for research or teaching careers. We believe this can best be accomplished by creating high expectations and setting high standards. While we set high expectations for our students, we also have complete confidence in your ability to meet these standards. We believe that our expectations reflect what is necessary to succeed in today’s competitive job market.

Prospective PhD students: Please directly contact any faculty members with whom you are interested in working for more information. To apply for the Developmental, Social, and Health PhD program, please click on the “Experimental Psychology” (vs. “Clinical Psychology”) option on the Graduate School application website.

Please see the program graduate handbook for more detailed information. We hope that the information is helpful to you! As always, we welcome feedback and are open to suggestions and innovations.

Information regarding applying and the online application system may be found here.

Please contact Meagan Coomes with questions regarding graduate program applications.


Developmental psych

The options are a chance for the students to apply their understanding of concepts from the core of the course. SL candidates must study one option HL candidates must study two. Each option has three "topics." The exam will give them three questions to choose from - they will choose one to write a well-developed essay in one hour. Each question comes from one of the three topics. There may not be two questions from.

To access the entire contents of this site, you need to log in or subscribe to it.


Developmental Psychology

The program in Developmental Psychology is designed to prepare skilled, creative developmental psychologists who are sensitive to issues of practical significance and trained to conduct and apply sound, meaningful social science research. An important strength of our program is the diversity of research skills, perspectives, and findings we bring to bear on a subject of central human concerns.

The program in Developmental Psychology is highly respected both nationally and internationally and covers all portions of the life-span from infancy to late life. Nineteen Core faculty, and other affiliated faculty, offer collaborative research training in social, cognitive, linguistic and brain development. Special strengths of the program include opportunities for training in:

  • Basic and applied research
    longitudinal methods
  • Developmental neuroscience
  • Development in the context of schools
  • Family and community influences on the life course
  • Including research with both normal and at-risk populations

The program has a strong tradition in interdisciplinary research and cross-cultural studies, and maintains active ties with outstanding programs around the world.

The Developmental Area also has a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development T32 Training Grant in Developmental Psychology. The Training Grant offers graduate and postdoctoral fellowships. Students are trained in interdisciplinary developmental science that brings together the fields of social context and neuroscience.

To Apply to the Developmental Psychology Program

The Department Psychology admits students only once each year for the fall term. To apply, you must complete the official online Rackham Graduate Application form. When completing this form you will have the opportunity to upload your Personal Statement, Statement of Purpose, and transcripts. You will also be prompted to register your recommenders, so that they will be able to submit their letters of recommendation online. All applicants who are applying to the Psychology Graduate Program should review the Psychology Department Graduate Application Checklist. Please do not send any hard copy materials to the Psychology Department.

For specific questions about the graduate program in Developmental Psychology, contact the Program Chair: Susan Gelman

For matriculation in Fall 2022, the deadline for submission of your application is December 1, 2021. Recruitment weekend will be February 18-19, 2022. All applicants are notified of admission decisions by April 1, 2022 or earlier.


On-line development psychology course materials, video and audio resources

Developmental Psychology.Org The teaching resources were created by those who teach Developmental Psychology or a related topic. Every resource is designed to help instructors make their classes as engaging and thought provoking as possible. Some resources are class activities, summaries, figures, hour-long lesson plans, and snippets to augment longer lesson plans. You may also consider submitting your best teaching ideas.

Learning & Teaching Developmental Psychology: Study psychological research and theory about children's social and cognitive development with resources like lesson plans, classroom activities, and web links.

The following teaching resources were created by those who teach Developmental Psychology or a related topic. Every resource is designed to help instructors make their classes as engaging and thought provoking as possible. Some resources are class activities, summaries, figures, hour-long lesson plans, and snippets to augment longer lesson plans.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology has on-line course materials for Developmental Psychology in the section of Brain and Cognitive Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

Seasons of Life is a series of instructional video in developmental psychology for college and high school students 5 one-hour video programs and 26 half-hour audio programs. The programs are an introduction to developmental psychology from conception through old age. The series explores the biological, psychological, and social "clocks" of life-span. Psychologists, sociologists, biologists, and anthropologists present theory, methods, and research. Real individuals from diverse backgrounds talk about the significant events in their lives.

Growing Old in a New Age is a series of 13 one-hour video programs on aging for college and high school students. The programs show the impact of aging on both society and individuals as diverse elders relate their experiences. The four ways that age is measured — chronologically, biologically, psychologically, and socially — are the basis for discussing the quality of life in later years. The programs examine common misconceptions about aging and provides a springboard for analyzing new roles for elders, intergenerational alliances, resource allocation, and artificial attempts to prolong life.

Death: A Personal Understanding is a series of 10 half-hour video programs on death and dying for college and high school students. The programs give a greater understanding of death and dying through case studies and moving personal stories of people facing their own death or the death of a loved one. The programs explore a wide range of North American cultural perspectives on death within the context of current issues, including AIDS, death by violence, suicide, assisted suicide, hospice care, end-of-life decision making, and how children react to death.

Developmental Psychology at Films on Demand: Digital Educational Video: Films On Demand is the web-based digital video delivery service that allows to view streaming videos from Films Media Group anytime, anywhere, 24/7. More than 5,500 educational titles in various subject areas. They have 144 films on Developmental Psychology (by September 11, 2010).

Films On Demand delivers high-quality digital video for students and faculty through online catalogs, distance learning courses and learning management systems. The films are available in full or by short segments. Special features allow users the ability to organize and bookmark clips, share playlists, personalize folders and manage the entire collection through an administrative reporting system.

PsychSim 5.0, developed by Thomas Ludwig, is a set of web-based interactive tutorials on various topics of Psychology. Those related to Developmental Psychology are:

This activity describes Piaget’s theory of the growth of intelligence and simulates the performance of three children of different ages on some of Piaget’s tasks.

This activity helps understand the sequence of prenatal development.

This activity helps understand Erik Erikson’s perspective on identity formation, as well as James Marcia’s four steps or stages in the identity process.


Insights into Teaching Psychology: Aha! Moments Podcast

Instructors crave aha! moments. The feeling you get when you can see the imaginary light bulb over their head illuminate as the finally “get it”… It’s addicting, rewarding, and necessary. So are these instances predictable? Controllable? Creatable? Join us for episode 8 of the Insights Intro Teaching Psychology Podcast Series for more on aha! moments.

2:52 –The vastness of Psychology and getting class started on Day 1

6:45 – Aha moments in the brain and behavior chapter

12:30 – Aha moments in the research methods chapter

20:08 – Positive and Negative Punishment and Reinforcement

28:54 – Aha moments in Memory

37:44 – Piaget and Development w/ Aha Moments

48:05 – How do you help students see what Psychology’s do outside of counseling

Rowan College at Burlington County

McGraw-Hill Resources for Aha! Moments

Subscribe to the Insights Into Psychology Podcast Series on iTunes an audio podcast series dedicated to the sharing of ideas, best practices, teaching tips, educational solutions, and other exciting topics in Psychology.